Pastor Letter July 26

Dear Parish Family,

Last Sunday I was delighted to witness the wedding vows of a couple who remembered me from Holy Child. The bride said,” I left a quote that you wrote in the parish bulletin when I was a child, during the summer”. I opened her note; and this is what I found. “Happiness keeps you sweet…. Trials keep you strong … and Sorrows keep you human…. Failures keep you humble… Success keeps you glowing… but only God keeps you going!” What a wonderful a timeless piece of wisdom, especially for newly-weds.

I have been admiring excerpts written by Archbishop Fulton Sheen, because he was a faith filled preacher. As Monsignor Vincent Bartley would say, “He had words at will”. Here is another example of timeless wisdom.

Some years ago, a girl wrote to me telling that at the age of eighteen she went to her first dance, in company with her cousin. After the dance, her cousin dropped her at the gate.  Her house was some distance from the gate, and in the distance between the gate and the front porch, she was attacked by a stranger. In due time, she found herself with a child. The only ones who would believer her were her mother and her pastor. Neighbor women said, “Oh, isn’t it terrible, the poor woman had one bad daughter.”  Some girls in the choir would not allow her to sing because she was wicked. She told me of all of this torture that she endured, and she said, “What’s the answer?”

          I wrote back to her and I said, “My dear girl, all of this suffering has come upon you because you bore the sin of one man. If you bore the sin of ten men, you would probably suffer ten times more. And if you ever took upon yourself the sins of a hundred men, the suffering would be a hundred times worse. And if you ever took upon yourself the sins of all the world, you might have had a bloody sweat.” That’s where you sin was, and mine: in that bloody sweat on Calvary: in this human nature that so loved us that we call the Sacred Heart.

          Our Lord was not just a teacher, but a redeemer.  He was coming to redeem man in the likeness of human flesh. Teachers change men by their lives. Our Blessed Lord would change men by his death. That poison of hate and sensuality and envy which is in the hearts of men could not be healed simply by mild exhortations of social reform.  The wage of sin is death, and therefore it is by death that sin would be atoned for.  As in ancient sacrifices where the fire symbolically burned up the imputed sin along with the victim, so on the cross the world’s sin would be put away in Christ’s suffering. Fir he would be upright as a priest and prostrate as a victim.  If there is anything a good teacher wants it is a long life which will make his teachings known. Death is always a great tragedy to a teacher.  The Socrates was given the hemlock juice, his message was cut off once and for all. Death was a stumbling block to Buddha and stood in the way of all the teachings of his eastern mystics. But Our Lord was always proclaiming his death, in which he took upon himself the sins of the world so he would appear as a sinner.

These words need to be reread to take in the deep level of this great man’s prayer and faith. May the Lord help you this summer to keep your focus on Christ.

God bless you all,

Father Tom Devery